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Urban Wildlands

Urban Wildlands

Coastal communities, especially densely populated ones, can also be considered as urban coastal communities. Some species can adapt and be domesticated to co-exist with humans. In some occasions, human settlements tend to introduce invasive species which in turn could affect the proximate coastal marine ecosystem, thereby affecting the marine biodiversity.

Thus, urban “wildlands” should also focus on sustainable land development, especially in the fringes of urban settlements were wildlands are present.

In these mentioned places, some species could be endangered and threatened either through a combination of habitat destruction, relentless hunting, and/or the introduction of invasive species that disrupt the local ecosystem.

The center is open to individuals who have a passion to support our expertise in land use, ecological balance, water, and soil standards, and biology which in turn translates to projects that will preserve habitats, suppress polluting industries, promote efficient use of resources, and other similar endeavors.

This is in line with our mantra: that biodiversity is a delicate balance of ecosystems. Partnering with urban planners and developers is also part of the strategy to support the continued protection of marine biodiversity.

Public Lands Work

Public Lands Work

In the United States, almost half of its land area is owned by the American public and managed on their behalf by government agencies. A good number of water bodies pass through these public lands, hence any pollution or environmentally-destructive activities done along these water bodies can potentially affect marine life as well.

Due to that, the Centre for Marine Biodiversity also uses a wide variety of its resources at its disposal in order to ensure that public lands are helpful in preserving the rich biological diversity present in the marine environment.

Ocean ecosystems are interconnected with terrestrial ecosystems, which is why well-maintained public lands are also essential in preserving marine biodiversity.

Aside from that, worldwide climate change is usually caused by terrestrial activities. In order to fulfill the core mantra of the center, public lands are also part of its concern as most methods to fight climate change such as carbon capture and sequestration, natural via trees or artificial, are done usually in public lands.

In its end, the center advocates the use of sound science, just laws, green policies, and strategic collaboration to protect and restore ecosystems that would be of critical use to marine biodiversity.

The center believes that efficient use of public lands will be of help in order to protect current niches of different species. While not directly a priority, the center advocates for sustainable land use that would not harm species and ecosystems – from use of organic fertilizers to opposing unsustainable logging. This is done through legal ways such as lawsuits, policies, and lobbying to usher sustainable use of public lands that would in return ensure the survival of many species both terrestrial and aquatic.

We work toward a future in which both marine and terrestrial ecosystems continue to work in sync to ensure the survival of its constituents.