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*** Click on numbered headings to download specified worksheets. ***
1. Key to Species List Worksheet (.xls) 

Locality abbreviations and other definitions in the worksheets.

2. References Worksheet (.zip)
1679 research articles were discovered and incorporated into our analyses. References were numbered sequentially and detailed information for each was recorded.

3. Taxonomy and Geography Worksheet (.zip)

“List A”

An early version of the Canadian Atlantic Register of Marine Species (Note that both the early and more recent versions of the Canadian Atlantic Register must be considered as preliminary and requiring verification of names), totaling approximately 5200 species. Localities and additional information make up the columns. Worksheet cells contain reference numbers from the References Worksheet which are summarized for each species in the last column. This list shows in detail where biodiversity information exists and is lacking in terms of taxonomy and geography.

“List B” (at record 6250)

Taxa studied in the DC but not on the Canadian Atlantic list (synonyms, etc.).

“List C” (at record 8013)

Species included in studies over a general range (e.g. northeastern United States, Canadian Atlantic) which may include the DC.

Beginning at record 8451 is a list of taxa from the DC literature not matched to the Canadian Atlantic list due to misspellings, etc. The small list at record 8759 summarizes references using names considered as synonyms in the Canadian Atlantic list.

At the end of this worksheet is a table discussed below under Analysis of study type – biodiversity, modeling, community.

4. Physical Parameters Worksheet (.xls)

Though not a primary project activity this worksheet summarized substantial information on DC physical parameters and processes. The worksheet is organized like the Taxonomy and Geography Worksheet.

These worksheets were analyzed to identify gaps in knowledge of DC biodiversity:

5. Taxonomic and Geographic Knowledge Gaps Worksheet (.xls)

Table 1. Taxonomic gaps - Class level

  • Rows are taxonomic classes, columns are major geographic regions, and cells are calculations from the Tax. & Geog. Worksheet of the number of cells for species in a class and localities in a region that contain one or more references.
  • The best studied class was the Actinopterygii, followed by the Malacostraca and Polychaeta.
  • Many classes were poorly represented.
  • This analysis does not differentiate whether a class is rare in the DC or poorly studied.

Table 2. Taxonomic gaps - Fish class Actinopterygii, order level

  • Rows are taxonomic orders, columns are major geographic regions, and cells are calculations from the Tax. & Geog. Worksheet of the number of cells for species in an order and localities in a region that contain one or more references.
  • The best studied order was the Perciformes, followed by the Gadiformes and Scorpaeniformes.
  • Many orders were poorly represented.
  • This analysis does not differentiate whether an order is rare in the DC or poorly studied.

Table 3. Geographic gaps

  • Columns are major geographic regions. Rows, listed as physiographic features, actually represent localities within a major geographic region, as defined below the table, of a given physiographic feature. Cells are calculations from the Tax. & Geog. Worksheet of the number of cells containing references for localities assigned to a physiographic feature type in a major geographic region.
  • Geographically, Bay of Fundy waters have been most studied, while canyons and seamounts have been studied much less.
  • Based on physiographic features, coastal waters have been subjected to the most investigation, followed by offshore banks and island waters. Seamounts have been most poorly studied.
Analysis of study type – biodiversity, modeling, community.
  • Located at record 8776 of the Taxonomy and Geography Worksheet is a table dividing DC research into studies examining biodiversity at a broad level, modeling studies, and types of communities studied across the 120 DC localities. Cells are reference numbers from the References Worksheet which are summarized for each row in the last column.
  • Fifty articles examined biodiversity at a broad level.
  • Of the modeling articles fisheries models were most prevalent, ecological models were nearly as numerous, with many fewer physiological.
  • Among community types benthic and plankton communities were most studied and investigations into subtidal and sandy beach communities were most infrequent.

Next Steps

Worksheets were designed to allow updating of content, though currently there are no plans to do so. Updating could include:
• most recent literature
• additional keywords
• improved taxonomy as the ARC’s Marine Species Registers are updated

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