Jessica Padilla

International Work

International Work

Protecting marine biodiversity is a global task. Ocean ecosystems are interconnected, and thus no country has a “monopoly” of responsibility when it comes to protecting these species. The center is committed to protecting marine species located in the world’s vast oceans. All kinds of species; even those that are even very much distinct from each other such as the Okinawa dugong, the polar bear, and the hawksbill turtles are covered by the scope of the center’s hard work.

We take pride in involving ourselves to take action and utilize standing international biodiversity protection treaties and trade laws to ensure the survival of many species. With our satellite offices in North America and our grassroots conservation-group allies in Europe, Africa, and Asia, the center is committed to securing a future for innumerable species and their respective habitats worldwide.

Here’s how we do it:

  • Establish connections with partner government agencies, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and related organizations to ensure smooth coordination for biodiversity-related projects
  • With the help of our established network of allies and supporters, the center can present petitions and legal action under relevant local and international laws depending on the situation the center is facing
  • Thanks to its established network, the center can advocate for international policies that would ultimately protect biodiversity, including marine biodiversity
  • Our allies can also build coalitions and partnership in relevant undertakings or projects
  • As part of the advocacy building, the center and its allies can utilize mass media for its undertaking and projects related to protecting biodiversity

Oceans Work

Oceans Work

The oceans around the world are so vast that they cover about 362 million square kilometers, which is around 70.9% of the Earth’s surface. Therefore, the scope of protecting marine biodiversity is a gargantuan task – almost as if one is literally carrying the earth in their shoulders.

A lot of problems may occur, especially at areas near human settlements – including overfishing, coral reef destruction, oil drilling, mangrove forest decimation, climate change, and acidification of oceans – which can threaten marine biodiversity.

The center tackles this problem as part of its international work and advocacy. We believe that the oceans, being vast, contain havens of yet to be discovered marine species. Hence, it is important to protect the biodiversity of these vast oceans from various threats.

One critical example of marine pollution is plastic pollution. These include even the tiniest microplastics and even large plastic-based fishing nets intentionally and unintentionally released by human activities. These plastic wastes can severely injure marine life such as sea turtles, seabirds, and whales by interfering with their normal digestion and feeding patterns.

To make matters worse, climate change is one of the reasons why the oceans are getting warmer and acidic, which in turns makes it harder for species to adapt. Coral bleaching, caused by ocean acidification, is also bad for marine biodiversity.

To respond to that dilemma, we take these measures:

  • Utilize sound science coupled with the latest data in order to prepare projects that would have the highest impact for the protection of marine biodiversity
  • With the help of our established network of allies and supporters, present petitions and legal action under relevant local and international laws that could counter ocean-destructive practices
  • With our established network, advocate for more protected habitats for marine species
  • Build coalitions and partnership in order to promote sustainable fishing
  • Utilize mass media to promote the protection of ocean biodiversity

Environmental Health Work

Environmental Health Work

The Centre for Marine Biodiversity wants to ensure the safety of marine biodiversity from an array of usually anthropogenic toxic substances. We believe that every product of human industrialization has effects on the health of not only humans but also other species.

The Industrial Revolution of the 18th century introduced countless novel products which in turn caused the release of numerous kinds of pollutants into the environment. While industrialization was not necessarily an evil development, it is careless and unsustainable industrialization that is the bane of modern civilization.

Such careless and unsustainable industrialization is usually driven by the greed of the few, allowing a lot to suffer needlessly. Pollutants, ranging from poisonous organic chemicals to heavy metals, affect the vulnerable population. This toxicity endangers the health of vulnerable populations such as the urban poor.

The pervasiveness of these chemicals means that they persist in the environment, affecting generations of people and non-human species. Sound research has found a wide variety of chemicals, many of which are toxic, in the blood of newborn human babies.

In response to that, we follow these methods:

  • Utilize sound science coupled with the latest data in order to prepare projects that would best shield the environment from the impact of these toxic chemicals
  • With the help of our established network of allies and supporters, present petitions and legal action under relevant local and international laws that could counter polluting practices to promote good environmental health
  • Advocate for more protected habitats for marine species
  • Utilize mass media to promote the good use of natural resources